This Week in Recovery – 2-22-15

Remember this, that very little is needed to make a happy life.We didn’t post our normal blogosphere summary last week, so this week’s will include posts from the last two weeks. Remember, these are just our favorites.  Be sure to post a comment with the most interesting articles or blog posts you have read this week!

 

 

Most Troubling:

The Fix with “Memo Tells US Border Patrol to Let Drunk Drivers Go Free”

“There is no legal requirement for a Border Patrol agent to intervene in a state crime, including DUI,” said the memo, and “therefore there is generally no liability that will attach to the agent or agency for failing to act in this situation.”

Most Honest:

Paul Garrigan with “How to Mindfully Find Your Life Purpose – Part 1

“I tried so hard to become a person other people would like, yet it just meant I felt more like an outsider than ever. It’s hardly surprising that by my teenage years, I began to experience a profound lack of purpose from living a stranger’s life. After years of attempting to fit in, I no longer even remembered my authentic self. I needed alcohol so living this false life felt bearable.”

Best Infographic:

Addiction Blog with “Eminem’s Quotes on Drugs and Addiction Recovery

Most Useful:

Chipur with “How to Call Upon and Nurture Your Relaxation Response

“1. Relax the muscles throughout your body: Lying down or sitting comfortably, close your eyes and feel relaxation gradually spread. What you’re looking for are feelings such as warmth, heaviness, tingling, floating – or nothing. If you need help with muscle relaxation and/or breathing, there’s a nice script here.

“2. Establish a relaxed breathing pattern, the goal being abdominal breaths. Plenty on breathing in this Chipur piece.

“3. Direct your attention from everyday thoughts by using a mental focusing device that’s neutral and repetitive. Jacobs suggests words such as one, relax, peace, heavy. For many, it’s helpful to repeat the word silently with each exhaled breath. The mental focusing device can also be a visual image – a vacation spot, floating on a cloud, or a place of your creation.”

Most Touching:

Momastery with “The Ashes You’re Made of Are Stardust

“We cried a little. Then we burned your pain to ashes. Your pain was so beautiful- going up in flames. Warming us, scaring us a little, even. Your pain was bright and it smelled like marshmallows. Then it was cool. Cool ashes can’t burn us.”

Most Insightful:

Dan Mager at Psychology Today with “If You Want Happiness, Resolve to Find Meaning

“The late 1990s saw the emergence of a “happiness movement” that began to suggest and even insist that people “should” be happier. In its extreme form this message implies that we have a responsibility to be happy, and if we are not, we are doing something wrong. “You shouldn’t feel that way.” Consistent with this trend, social expectations have transformed normal, natural sadness and sorrow (as distinguished from clinicaldepression) into a depressive disorder. What used to be considered appropriate emotional reactions to loss and other painful life events are now frequently viewed as problematic or even pathological, necessitating counseling and/or medication with the ever-expanding repertoire of antidepressants.”

Most Vulnerable:

Glennon Doyle Melton with “Lesson from the Mental Hospital”

“We are born to make our unknown know. We will find somewhere to do it. So, in private, with the booze or the overshopping or the alcohol or the food, we tell the truth.  We say, “Actually, I’m not fine.” Because we don’t feel safe telling that truth in the real world, we make our own little world; and that’s addiction.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHHPNMIK-fY


So, what were your favorite posts. videos or articles this week?  Leave them in the comments.  If you liked this post, be sure to share it with all your friends on Facebook, Twitter or your favorite social media outlet!


 

Serenity House is a drug and alcohol treatment center offering medically-supervised detox, residential and outpatient treatment, and prevention services.  You can learn more about Serenity House at our treatment center website.

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